Saturday, April 22, 2017

April 2017 Chapter Update from our President

                                                             
April Update

            April has as been a busy month and the time is fast approaching for our spring cookout. The event is planned for Saturday the 29th of April from 5 to 8 PM at the Chapter clubhouse. If the weather cooperates we plan to set up the tables outside for everyone to enjoy the nice evening. If not, everything will be setup inside.
To keep our cost down I am asking that everyone attending who’s last name begins with letters between A and M to bring a vegetable or salad and those whose name begins with letters between N and Z to bring a dessert. Also a $10.00 donation for each dinner would be greatly appreciated. Getting a $20.00 dinner for ten bucks is a real deal nowadays.

The chapter will be providing steaks and a fish entre as well as water and sodas. If you desire to have something a little more to your liking with your steak, please feel free to bring it along.
Please let John Stackhouse at jstack@bmcmoves.com, John Hayes at fossilcreek@bluemarble.com, or myself at g.harkin2010@comcast.net know how many in your party will attend and their preference of steak or fish.

Last Saturday we had a work party take care of the molding insulation that was in the floor of the clubhouse. John Hayes, whose past experience as a contractor was invaluable, led the project. The project required pulling down all the old insulation from between the floor supports and dragging it to the crawlspace entrance where a team was waiting to put the insulation into plastic bags. Once all the insulation was removed, a large plastic sheet was laid on the floor to prevent moisture from rising into the bottom of the floor. Along with that work, all the vents were covered with plastic to hopefully seal off the entire crawlspace. Thanks to all who worked the project, but if you were not able to attend don’t worry, we have many more projects in the queue for the year to come.

The chapter is still putting to together the details for the upcoming
Tri-Motor visit on the 18th of May. Many details remain to be worked out but I believe we are on track to have a great turnout. The billboard for the event will be located on old 37 just north of the McDonalds. Radio announcements are planned along with flyers to be posted throughout the city. As the date draws near, we will need more workers for a variety of jobs for the entire weekend. This will be our major fundraising event for the year so I hope everyone can attend and get a ride in the Tri-Motor.

From the “It’s All in How you Say It” category:

Controller to aircraft just landed: Bear right, next intersection.
Pilot: Roger, we have him in sight.
ATC: Cessna G-ABCD What are your intentions?
Cessna: To get my Commercial Pilots License and Instrument Rating.
ATC; I meant in the next five minutes, not years.

I suspect we were all there at one time in flying careers. Everyone fly safe and see you at the spring cookout.

Jerry Harkin
President

EAA 650

Saturday work party on the EAA 650 Clubhouse



Tim Sparks took few pictures of the work that was done on 4-15-2017
Bagging it as it comes out.



How it came out. 

Windy bag management


crawlspace







The first 2 to go under, and the last out.



cutting the vapor barrier



Where's lunch?

Thanks to Tim Sparks for taking the pics

Sunday, April 16, 2017

EAA Tri Motor Poster


Tri Motor Coming to KBMG


Fwd: Speaker After Action Report


Fifteen members of our EAA 650 Chapter welcomed Scott Bradley to the
clubhouse on Saturday morning for his presentation. Scott owns and
operates Bradley Aviation at the Columbus Airport and supports the
fleet of Civil Air Patrol aircraft from Indiana and parts of Kentucky.
After brief introductions he discussed some of the different
maintenance requirements that are associated with the CAP aircraft.
For example they operate based on 100 hour inspections in lieu of an
annual. He brought along some training aids in the form of aircraft
parts that have proven to be trouble spots for the maintenance
program. He also went into difficulties associated with this type of
program due to the many differences. There was a brief discussion on
those maintenance items that an owner can perform on their certified
aircraft and passed out a list of those items for everyone to have a
copy of. There we also a handout passed out with some new FAA guidance
that will be coming along. All in all it was a presentation well worth
our time and based on the round of applause at the end, it was
informative for all.
The presentation lasted nearly two hours and there were a lot of
questions asked from the audience. For those of you who couldn't make
it, you missed a very informative presentation by an experienced A&P,
and IA. He has volunteered to have our group come over to his shop
sometime and take a look at some of the projects he is working on. He
has a Steerman that was in storage for a long time that was sold to a
new owner and he is rebuilding the aircraft. I told him we would take
him up on that offer later in the year.

Next month we will be supporting Tim Sparks and the Olympiad on the IU
campus. We still need volunteers to time the events so raise your hand
and join the group in support of program. Those kids are great to work
with and really appreciate our support.

Finally, we are still looking for the annual dues to be paid. There
are quite a few of our past members that have not signed up for this
year. If you have changed your mind about being a member let me know
so we can take your name off the email list.

Have a Great Week

Jerry Harkin
President
EAA 650

Sunday, April 02, 2017

2017 Science Olympiad


Thanks to all who helped, another successful event.

4-engine Grumman Goose



https://www.google.com/search?q=grumman ... NtkZh1tuuM:

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/original-1959-slide-mckinnon-n3459c-1807039874

Two of these were converted by McKinnon in1958-59. Lycoming GSO480
engines, 340hp.

Fwd: FW: WW II B-17 Survival Story


Amazing WWII B-17 Survival Story! - DD

 

In Wartime - the unbelievable often happens--if ever there was a miracle for the USA during WW II, this is it!


B-17 "All American" (414th Squadron, 97BG) Crew

Pilot- Ken Bragg Jr.
Copilot- G. Boyd Jr.
Navigator- Harry C. Nuessle
Bombardier- Ralph Burbridge
Engineer- Joe C. James
Radio Operator- Paul A. Galloway
Ball Turret Gunner- Elton Conda
Waist Gunner- Michael Zuk
Tail Gunner- Sam T. Sarpolus
Ground Crew Chief- Hank Hyland

In 1943 a mid-air collision on February 1, 1943, between a B-17 and a German fighter over the Tunis dock area, became the subject of one of the most famous photographs of WW II. An enemy fighter attacking a 97th Bomb Group formation went out of control, probably with a wounded pilot, then continued its crashing descent into the rear of the fuselage of a Fortress named "All American", piloted by Lt. Kendrick R. Bragg, of the 414th Bomb Squadron. When it struck, the fighter broke apart, but left some pieces in the B-17. The left horizontal stabilizer of the Fortress and left elevator were completely torn away. The two right engines were out and one on the left had a serious oil pump leak. The vertical fin and the rudder had been damaged, the fuselage had been cut almost completely through connected only at two small parts of the frame, and the radios, electrical and oxygen systems were damaged. There was also a hole in the top that was over 16 feet long and 4 feet wide at its widest; the split in the fuselage went all the way to the top gunner's turret.



Although the tail actually bounced and swayed in the wind and twisted when the plane turned and all the control cables were severed, except one single elevator cable still worked, and the aircraft miraculously still flew!

The tail gunner was trapped because there was no floor connecting the tail to the rest of the plane. The waist and tail gunners used parts of the German fighter and their own parachute harnesses in an attempt to keep the tail from ripping off and the two sides of the fuselage from splitting apart.

While the crew was trying to keep the bomber from coming apart, the pilot continued on his bomb run and released his bombs over the target.



When the bomb bay doors were opened, the wind turbulence was so great that it blew one of the waist gunners into the broken tail section. It took several minutes and four crew members to pass him ropes from parachutes and haul him back into the forward part of the plane. When they tried to do the same for the tail gunner, the tail began flapping so hard that it began to break off. The weight of the gunner was adding some stability to the tail section, so he went back to his position. The turn back toward England had to be very slow to keep the tail from twisting off. They actually covered almost 70 miles to make the turn home. The bomber was so badly damaged that it was losing altitude and speed and was soon alone in the sky.


For a brief time, two more Me-109 German fighters attacked the All American. Despite the extensive damage, all of the machine gunners were able to respond to these attacks and soon drove off the fighters. The two waist gunners stood up with their heads sticking out through the hole in the top of the fuselage to aim and fire their machine guns. The tail gunner had to shoot in short bursts because the recoil was actually causing the plane to turn.




Allied P-51 fighters intercepted the All American as it crossed over the Channel and took one of the pictures shown. They also radioed to the base describing that the appendage was waving like a fish tail and that the plane would not make it and to send out boats to rescue the crew when they bailed out.

The fighters stayed with the Fortress, taking hand signals from Lt. Bragg and relaying them to the base. Lt. Bragg signaled that 5 parachutes and the spare had been "used" so five of the crew could not bail out. He made the decision that if they could not bail out safely, then he would stay with the plane to land it.



Two and a half hours after being hit, the aircraft made its final turn to line up with the runway while it was still over 40 miles away. It descended into an emergency landing and a normal roll-out on its landing gear.



When the ambulance pulled alongside, it was waved off because not a single member of the crew had been injured. No one could believe that the aircraft could still fly in such a condition. The Fortress sat placidly until the crew all exited through the door in the fuselage and the tail gunner had climbed down a ladder, at which time the entire rear section of the aircraft collapsed.



This old bird had done its job and brought the entire crew home uninjured.


I love these old war stories, especially the ones with a happy ending !




Please pass this on to someone who will also appreciate this amazing story.





Fwd: The B-17 -Great photo story





The B-17 -Great photo story
I read about this incident and saw some of the pictures before but had not read this detailed account of the damage to the B-17 and how the crew flew it home. It is a good read. BB
  
  
B-17 "All American" (414th Squadron, 97BG) Crew 
Pilot- Ken Bragg Jr. 
Co-pilot- G. Boyd Jr. 
Navigator- Harry C. Nuessle 
Bombardier- Ralph Burbridge 
Engineer- Joe C. James 
Radio Operator- Paul A. Galloway 
Ball Turret Gunner- Elton Conda 
Waist Gunner- Michael Zuk 
Tail Gunner- Sam T. Sarpolus 
Ground Crew Chief- Hank Hyland 

In 1943 a mid-air collision on February 1, 1943, Between a B-17 and a German fighter over the Tunis dock area became the subject of one of the most famous photographs of WW II. An enemy fighter attacking a 97th Bomb Group formation went out of control, probably with a wounded pilot, then continued its crashing descent into the rear of the fuselage of a Flying Fortress named "All American", piloted by Lt. Kendrick R. Bragg, of the 414th Bomb Squadron. When it struck, the fighter broke apart, but left some pieces in the B-17. The left horizontal stabilizer of the Fortress and left elevator were completely torn away. The two right engines were out and one on the left had a serious oil pump leak. The vertical fin and the rudder had been damaged. The fuselage had been cut almost completely through, connected only at two small parts of the frame. The radios, electrical and oxygen systems were damaged. There was also a hole in the top that was over 16-feet long and 4 feet wide at its widest. The split in the fuselage went all the way to the top gunner's turret. 
 
 Although the tail actually bounced and swayed in the wind and twisted when the plane turned. All the control cables were severed, except one single elevator cable still worked, and the aircraft miraculously still flew! 

The tail gunner was trapped because there was no floor connecting the tail to the rest of the plane. The waist and tail gunners used parts of the German fighter and their own parachute harnesses in an attempt to keep the tail from ripping off and the two sides of the fuselage from splitting apart. While the crew was trying to keep the bomber from coming apart, the pilot continued on his bomb run and released his bombs over the target. 
 
 When the bomb bay doors were opened, the wind turbulence was so great that it blew one of the waist gunners into the broken tail section. It took several minutes and four crew members to pass him ropes from parachutes and haul him back into the forward part of the plane. When they tried to do the same for the tail gunner, the tail began flapping so hard that it began to break off. The weight of the gunner was adding some stability to the tail section, so he went back to his position. 

The turn back toward England had to be very slow to keep the tail from twisting off. They actually covered almost 70 miles to make the turn home.   The bomber was so badly damaged that it was losing altitude and speed and was soon alone in the sky. 
For a brief time, two more Me-109 German fighters attacked the All American. Despite the extensive damage, all of the machine gunners were able to respond to these attacks and soon drove off the fighters. The two waist gunners stood up with their heads sticking out through the hole in the top of the fuselage to aim and fire their machine guns. The tail gunner had to shoot in short bursts because the recoil was actually causing the plane to turn. 
Allied P-51 fighters intercepted the All American as it crossed over the Channel and took one of the pictures shown. They also radioed to the base describing that the appendage was waving like a fish tail and that the plane would not make it and to send out boats to rescue the crew when they bailed out.
The fighters stayed with the Fortress, taking hand signals from Lt. Bragg and relaying them to the base. Lt. Bragg signalled that 5 parachutes and the spare had been "used" so five of the crew could not bail out. He made the decision that if they could not bail out safely, then he would stay with the plane to land it.
Two and a half hours after being hit, the aircraft made its final turn to line up with the runway while it was still over 40 miles away. It descended into an emergency landing and a normal roll-out on its landing gear. 
When the ambulance pulled alongside, it was waved off because not a single member of the crew had been injured. No one could believe that the aircraft could still fly in such a condition. The Fortress sat placidly until the crew all exited through the door in the fuselage and the tail gunner had climbed down a ladder, at which time the entire rear section of the aircraft collapsed. 
This old bird had done its job and brought the entire crew home uninjured. 
Please pass this on to someone who will also appreciate this amazing story.









Wednesday, May 04, 2016

Barnstormers Of America Ride Event / Experimental Aircraft Association

** PRESS RELEASE **
Barnstormers Of America Ride Event / Experimental Aircraft Association  
Monroe County Airport Awareness Days
The local Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Chapter 650 and Cook Aviation Inc. at the Monroe County Airport invite YOU and YOUR FAMILY to attend Aviation Awareness Days, Friday, May 20 – Sunday, May 22, 2016 where there will be EAA aircraft on display in conjunction with the Aviation Awareness Days Event.   Activities are scheduled from 9:00 am – 6:00 pm.  Don’t miss and schedule a ride in the 1929 New Standard Aircraft (rides are $90 each seat for -- once-in-a-lifetime experience)!!   Visit www.BiplaneRidesOfAmerica.com, call (608)751-800 to schedule the ride, or just show up for an outstanding ride!!  You will see aircraft displays, antique & classic automobiles, food vendor, and much – much more!!   
Don’t Miss This Exciting Experience At The Monroe County Airport, Friday, May 20th – Sunday, May 22nd !!
9:00 am – 6:00 pm
   
       

Friday, April 22, 2016

Fwd: Chapter 650 Spring Cookout


Hey Folks,

            This is just a little note to inform you that our spring cookout has been pushed back a couple of weeks due to this cold, rainy weather.    We are rescheduling the event for Saturday, April 30th at 6:00 at the Jacobs, Siscoe hanger.  For everyone interested in attending, please send us the number of people in your party and tell us whether each would prefer to eat steak or salmon.

            Thank you and I hope to see everyone there on the 30th.


Cordially,


John Hayes

Thursday, April 07, 2016

Indiana Science Olympiad Volunteers

Thanks from Tom Sanders for Indiana Science Olympiad

Subject: SO Flying
Tim,

Thanks again for arranging to have such a good crew available for the SO flying events at the state competition. Everyone did a great job and we were able to keep on task with all FOUR flying events. In the evening I attended the awards assembly and to make a couple of presentations in front of the crowd of 5,000. Lot's of cheering while I was on stage and it was obvious that we had done a good job. This I know from the many thank-you's and positive comments from the coaches and families on how we had provided of the best experiences on both Friday and Saturday; especially that "party"on Friday night. At least thirty people approached me after the awards ceremony to say thanks and to keep up the good work.

NONE of this could happen without the support, expertise and professionalism that your EAA club brings to these events. Many thanks to you and your friends for making the events the best in the state of Indiana. Please pass-on my appreciation.

PS- work on your Aerial Scramble airplane between now and next year. I would love to have another go...

Best Regards,
Tom Sanders

Indiana Science Olympiad Post from Tina Gilliland to Tim Sparks

Dear Tim,
WOW!  I am always amazed by the team of people that unite together each spring to make the Indiana Science Olympiad tournament such a resounding success.  Indiana University and Indiana Science Olympiad are so very thankful to you for your dedication to teaching, molding, and encouraging K-12 science students.  I know I can always count on you to provide a grade level appropriate and challenging competition!  Please pass along my sincerest thanks to the Experimental Aircraft Association Ch. 650 for their help as well!
I want to share with you some very impressive numbers.
·         2,211 – total attendance at the Awards Ceremony (note three schools had to leave before the awards ceremony due to spring break trips, football, etc.)
·         1080 – Official Science Olympiad Competitors (middle & high school students)
·         800  – Additional middle & high school students in attendance to observe & help their teams
·         222 – Volunteer from all across Indiana
·         531  – Parents, teachers, school administrators, and bus drivers
·         72 – Schools
·         42 – Cities represented
·         575 – total individual Olympic-style medals awarded (1st-5th place)
·         10 – trophies awarded (top 5 schools in each division)
Experiencing our campus through the Science Olympiad lens is priceless. These students have already developed a love of science.  You are helping us expose them to Science at IU.  For some this was their first time stepping foot in a chemistry, physics or a biology laboratory and their first time interacting with faculty, research scientists, and graduate & undergraduate students.  You and volunteers like you are the key to our success!!
I do hope the time you expended prior to and on tournament day was fun and rewarding. I have received many thank you notes from coaches and parents who have commented on the fun, challenging and fair events at the tournament and how smoothly things ran. You should be very proud for the part you played in providing such a rewarding experience to these young students! I cannot stress enough how valuable your time and expertise are to me, the students, and all involved in the Science Olympiad State Tournament.
Coach & Parent Comments:
““Thank you for all your hard work in putting on the tournament. Last week was my 9th State Tournament as a Science Olympiad parent, and I continue to be amazed at the dedication of the staff and volunteers and at the enthusiasm of the students. I feel hopeful about the future every time I see the Auditorium full of kids geeking out on science. “ – Dana Cattani, Parent & Faculty member Kelley School of Business
“I just wanted to thank you and your team for a well done and enjoyable event yesterday.  It's my first year as a coach so having everything run so smoothly made it a much easier day for me. Most importantly, the kids had a great day! I'm looking forward to next year. --Kerri Donohue, Coach, BHSN
“Thank you for all you do for our kids.  They had a terrific experience and will carry those memories with them for a lifetime. --Martha Bowman, Coach, Tri-North Middle School
Thomas Jefferson Middle School and Carmel High School will be the teams representing Indiana at the National Tournament in Wisconsin next month. Based on their performances at the state tournament I am confident that they will come home with many National medals! Kudos to you and all our event supervisors for helping prepare Indiana students for Nationals!!
On behalf of Indiana University, College of Arts & Sciences, and the Science Outreach Office we applaud your commitment to science education and I hope I will have the pleasure of working with you again in the future. 
Congratulations again on making the 2016 tournament a huge success...we absolutely couldn't do it without you!
Warmest regards,
Tina
Tina Gilliland
Outreach Liaison
Indiana University
College of Arts & Sciences
1600 East Third Street
Bloomington, IN 47401

2016 Schedule

DATE EVENT 
ORGANIZER  LOCATION

Feb 20  An Aerial Tour of Australia  by Steve Clark
Rich Frisbie  BMG

March 11  Indy Center Tour
Jerry Harkin  Indy Center

March 19  Science Olympiad
Tim Sparks  IU Mellencamp Pavilion

April 30  Spring Cook-Out
John Stackhouse  Sciscoe Hangar

May 14  Barnstormers Event
Rich Frisbie  Ramp

June 11 A Wonder-full Cook-out & Spot Landing Contest
Mike Wonder  Shawnee Airport

July 23  RC Demo
Tim Porter

Aug 20 Oshkosh Photo Review
John Hayes  BMG

Sept 17  Air Force Museum Outing
Jim LeSeure  Dayton, OH

Oct 1-2  Red Bull Air Races
Russ Goodwine  Indy Speedway

Nov 19 Seymour Air Museum
Barratt Patton Seymour

Dec 17  Christmas Dinner Party
Jack Eads  BMG

Fwd: TAKE OFF from St Maarten


Subject: TAKE OFF from St Maarten

FW: Cub (Video)

https://www.youtube.com/embed/pmptFkKSeYQ?feature=player_detailpage

Fwd: An experience to recall (P-51 & Pilot)

This 1967 true story is of an experience by a young 12 year old lad in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. It is about the vivid memory of a privately rebuilt P-51 from WWII and its famous owner/pilot.

In the morning sun, I could not believe my eyes. There, in our little
airport, sat a majestic P-51. They said it had flown in during the
night from some U.S. Airport, on its way to an air show. The pilot
had been tired, so he just happened to choose Kingston for his stop over. It was to take to the air very soon. I marveled at the size of the plane, dwarfing the Pipers and Canucks tied down by her. It was much larger than in the movies. She glistened in the sun like a bulwark of security from days gone by.

The pilot arrived by cab, paid the driver, and then stepped into the
pilot's lounge. He was an older man; his wavy hair was gray and
tossed. It looked like it might have been combed, say, around the
turn of the century. His flight jacket was checked, creased and worn - it smelled old and genuine. Old Glory was prominently sewn to its shoulders. He projected a quiet air of proficiency and pride devoid of arrogance. He filed a quick flight plan to Montreal ("Expo-67 Air Show") then walked across the tarmac.

After taking several minutes to perform his walk-around check, the tall, lanky man returned to the flight lounge to ask if anyone would be available to stand by with fire extinguishers while he "flashed the old bird up, just to be safe." Though only 12 at the time I was allowed to stand by with an extinguisher after brief instruction on its use -- "If you see a fire, point, then pull this lever!", he said. (I later became a firefighter, but that's another story.) The air around the exhaust manifolds shimmered like a mirror from fuel fumes as the huge prop started to rotate. One manifold, then another, and yet another barked -- I stepped back with the others. In moments the Packard -built Merlin engine came to life with a thunderous roar. Blue flames knifed from her manifolds with an arrogant snarl. I looked at the others' faces; there was no concern. I lowered the bell of my extinguisher.
One of the guys signaled to walk back to the lounge. We did.

Several minutes later we could hear the pilot doing his pre-flight
run-up. He'd taxied to the end of runway 19, out of sight. All went
quiet for several seconds. We ran to the second story deck to see if we could catch a glimpse of the P-51 as she started down the runway. We could not. There we stood, eyes fixed to a spot half way down 19. Then a roar ripped across the field, much louder than before. Like a furious hell spawn set loose -- something mighty this way was coming. "Listen to that thing!" said the controller.

In seconds the Mustang burst into our line of sight. It's tail was
already off the runway and it was moving faster than anything I'd ever seen by that point on 19. Two-thirds the way down 19 the Mustang was airborne with her gear going up. The prop tips were supersonic. We clasped our ears as the Mustang climbed hellishly fast into the circuit to be eaten up by the dog-day haze. We stood for a few moments, in stunned silence, trying to digest what we'd just seen.
The radio controller rushed by me to the radio. "Kingston tower
calling Mustang?" He looked back to us as he waited for an
acknowledgment. The radio crackled, "Go ahead, Kingston." "Roger, Mustang. Kingston tower would like to advise the circuit is clear for a low level pass." I stood in shock because the controller had just, more or less, asked the pilot to return for an impromptu air show! The controller looked at us. "Well, What?" He asked.
"I can't let that guy go without asking. I couldn't forgive myself!"

The radio crackled once again, "Kingston, do I have permission for a low level pass, east to west, across the field?" "Roger, Mustang, the circuit is clear for an east to west pass." "Roger, Kingston, I'm coming out of 3,000 feet, stand by."
We rushed back onto the second-story deck, eyes fixed toward the eastern haze. The sound was subtle at first, a high-pitched whine, a muffled screech, a distant scream. Moments later the P-51 burst through the haze. Her airframe straining against positive G's and gravity. Her wing tips spilling contrails of condensed air, prop-tips again supersonic. The burnished bird blasted across the eastern margin of the field shredding and tearing the air. At about 500 mph and 150 yards from where we stood she passed with the old American pilot saluting. Imagine.
A salute! I felt like laughing; I felt like crying; she glistened; she screamed; the building shook; my heart pounded. Then the old pilot pulled her up and rolled, and rolled, and rolled out of sight into the broken clouds and indelible into my memory.

I've never wanted to be an American more than on that day! It was a time when many nations in the world looked to America as their big brother. A steady and even-handed beacon of security who navigated difficult political water with grace and style; not unlike the old American pilot who'd just flown into my memory. He was proud, not arrogant, humble, not a braggart, old and honest, projecting an aura of America at its best.

That America will return one day! I know it will! Until that time,
I'll just send off this story. Call it a loving reciprocal salute to a Country, and especially to that old American pilot: the late-
JIMMY STEWART (1908-1997), Actor, real WWII Hero (Commander of a US Army Air Force Bomber Wing stationed in England), and a USAF Reserves Brigadier General, who wove a wonderfully fantastic memory for a young Canadian boy that's lasted a lifetime.

April 2017 Chapter Update from our President

                                                              April Update             April has as been a busy month and the time is ...