Monday, June 26, 2017

Saturday Morning Breakfast




All
The Saturday morning breakfast we had was a resounding success. The eggs to order, the bacon fried crispy, the fruit garnish, the DVD movie on Alaskan Piper Cubs landing on very short sandbars, all made it a great get-together for those who chose to attend. After all was cleaned up and put away a survey of those in attendance agreed we should have a Saturday morning breakfast meeting once a month so that will be our plan for the coming months. Our thanks goes out to John Hayes who led the cooking effort and to Gary Fender for helping in the cleanup. We will be looking for a volunteer cook for next month so if you love to cook here is your chance to show everyone you're cooking skills.
For those of you who couldn’t make to the breakfast, you missed a good one. Hopefully once we announce the schedule for July we can get a better turnout.

High Lights from the BMG Airport Board Meeting include:

A new PAPI to replace the VASI on runway 17 is coming.

A new approach lighting system for the ILS on runway 35 is coming.

Watch for NOTAMS on both these items.

A barrier along the fence line around the entire airport is being constructed to prevent animals from crawling under the fence.

Land purchase for the 55 acres north of the airport is now complete.

Cook Aviation lease has been extended 5 years.

CAP will be parking their communication trailer somewhere inside the fence on the airport. Exact location TBD.

After discussion it was unanimous that there will NOT be any formal airshow activity at the airport due to a number of issues.This does not rule out anything the EAA may bring in for demonstrations.


Everyone Fly Safe and have a Great 4th of July.


Jerry Harkin
President
EAA 650

british airways fail

THE BOLD AVIATOR

http://messybeast.com/dragonqueen/bold-aviator.htm

Brown County Bald Eagles June Meeting




The Brown County Bald Eagles will host their June meeting this upcoming Saturday 10 June at the Brown County Inn located at the intersection of SR-135 and SR-46.
The  Speaker will be Randy Yablonowski and he will be speaking about his career in Aviation and in particular his involvement in counter terrorist equipment development were he flew in the Nellis, NV AFB test ranges. Randy currently flies the Lifeline Helicopter where he is involved with recovering critically injured patients that need immediate medical attention.
Meet and greet will start at 5:30 PM with a served dinner at 6:30. Meal choices are Fried Chicken mashed potatoes and gravy, Fish and Chips or Salad with Grilled chicken. 
The meal is  $18 cash or check paid at the door.
The Brown County Bald Eagles have been meeting twice a year for over 25 years and are made up of Military Veterans and others who have an interest in aviation and aviation history. The dress is casual and a RSVP is needed to make sure we have a meal for you at 812 988 2377 or email BCBaldeagles@gmail.com.







Saturday, April 22, 2017

April 2017 Chapter Update from our President

                                                             
April Update

            April has as been a busy month and the time is fast approaching for our spring cookout. The event is planned for Saturday the 29th of April from 5 to 8 PM at the Chapter clubhouse. If the weather cooperates we plan to set up the tables outside for everyone to enjoy the nice evening. If not, everything will be setup inside.
To keep our cost down I am asking that everyone attending who’s last name begins with letters between A and M to bring a vegetable or salad and those whose name begins with letters between N and Z to bring a dessert. Also a $10.00 donation for each dinner would be greatly appreciated. Getting a $20.00 dinner for ten bucks is a real deal nowadays.

The chapter will be providing steaks and a fish entre as well as water and sodas. If you desire to have something a little more to your liking with your steak, please feel free to bring it along.
Please let John Stackhouse at jstack@bmcmoves.com, John Hayes at fossilcreek@bluemarble.com, or myself at g.harkin2010@comcast.net know how many in your party will attend and their preference of steak or fish.

Last Saturday we had a work party take care of the molding insulation that was in the floor of the clubhouse. John Hayes, whose past experience as a contractor was invaluable, led the project. The project required pulling down all the old insulation from between the floor supports and dragging it to the crawlspace entrance where a team was waiting to put the insulation into plastic bags. Once all the insulation was removed, a large plastic sheet was laid on the floor to prevent moisture from rising into the bottom of the floor. Along with that work, all the vents were covered with plastic to hopefully seal off the entire crawlspace. Thanks to all who worked the project, but if you were not able to attend don’t worry, we have many more projects in the queue for the year to come.

The chapter is still putting to together the details for the upcoming
Tri-Motor visit on the 18th of May. Many details remain to be worked out but I believe we are on track to have a great turnout. The billboard for the event will be located on old 37 just north of the McDonalds. Radio announcements are planned along with flyers to be posted throughout the city. As the date draws near, we will need more workers for a variety of jobs for the entire weekend. This will be our major fundraising event for the year so I hope everyone can attend and get a ride in the Tri-Motor.

From the “It’s All in How you Say It” category:

Controller to aircraft just landed: Bear right, next intersection.
Pilot: Roger, we have him in sight.
ATC: Cessna G-ABCD What are your intentions?
Cessna: To get my Commercial Pilots License and Instrument Rating.
ATC; I meant in the next five minutes, not years.

I suspect we were all there at one time in flying careers. Everyone fly safe and see you at the spring cookout.

Jerry Harkin
President

EAA 650

Saturday work party on the EAA 650 Clubhouse



Tim Sparks took few pictures of the work that was done on 4-15-2017
Bagging it as it comes out.



How it came out. 

Windy bag management


crawlspace







The first 2 to go under, and the last out.



cutting the vapor barrier



Where's lunch?

Thanks to Tim Sparks for taking the pics

Sunday, April 16, 2017

EAA Tri Motor Poster


Tri Motor Coming to KBMG


Fwd: Speaker After Action Report


Fifteen members of our EAA 650 Chapter welcomed Scott Bradley to the
clubhouse on Saturday morning for his presentation. Scott owns and
operates Bradley Aviation at the Columbus Airport and supports the
fleet of Civil Air Patrol aircraft from Indiana and parts of Kentucky.
After brief introductions he discussed some of the different
maintenance requirements that are associated with the CAP aircraft.
For example they operate based on 100 hour inspections in lieu of an
annual. He brought along some training aids in the form of aircraft
parts that have proven to be trouble spots for the maintenance
program. He also went into difficulties associated with this type of
program due to the many differences. There was a brief discussion on
those maintenance items that an owner can perform on their certified
aircraft and passed out a list of those items for everyone to have a
copy of. There we also a handout passed out with some new FAA guidance
that will be coming along. All in all it was a presentation well worth
our time and based on the round of applause at the end, it was
informative for all.
The presentation lasted nearly two hours and there were a lot of
questions asked from the audience. For those of you who couldn't make
it, you missed a very informative presentation by an experienced A&P,
and IA. He has volunteered to have our group come over to his shop
sometime and take a look at some of the projects he is working on. He
has a Steerman that was in storage for a long time that was sold to a
new owner and he is rebuilding the aircraft. I told him we would take
him up on that offer later in the year.

Next month we will be supporting Tim Sparks and the Olympiad on the IU
campus. We still need volunteers to time the events so raise your hand
and join the group in support of program. Those kids are great to work
with and really appreciate our support.

Finally, we are still looking for the annual dues to be paid. There
are quite a few of our past members that have not signed up for this
year. If you have changed your mind about being a member let me know
so we can take your name off the email list.

Have a Great Week

Jerry Harkin
President
EAA 650

Sunday, April 02, 2017

2017 Science Olympiad


Thanks to all who helped, another successful event.

4-engine Grumman Goose



https://www.google.com/search?q=grumman ... NtkZh1tuuM:

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/original-1959-slide-mckinnon-n3459c-1807039874

Two of these were converted by McKinnon in1958-59. Lycoming GSO480
engines, 340hp.

Fwd: FW: WW II B-17 Survival Story


Amazing WWII B-17 Survival Story! - DD

 

In Wartime - the unbelievable often happens--if ever there was a miracle for the USA during WW II, this is it!


B-17 "All American" (414th Squadron, 97BG) Crew

Pilot- Ken Bragg Jr.
Copilot- G. Boyd Jr.
Navigator- Harry C. Nuessle
Bombardier- Ralph Burbridge
Engineer- Joe C. James
Radio Operator- Paul A. Galloway
Ball Turret Gunner- Elton Conda
Waist Gunner- Michael Zuk
Tail Gunner- Sam T. Sarpolus
Ground Crew Chief- Hank Hyland

In 1943 a mid-air collision on February 1, 1943, between a B-17 and a German fighter over the Tunis dock area, became the subject of one of the most famous photographs of WW II. An enemy fighter attacking a 97th Bomb Group formation went out of control, probably with a wounded pilot, then continued its crashing descent into the rear of the fuselage of a Fortress named "All American", piloted by Lt. Kendrick R. Bragg, of the 414th Bomb Squadron. When it struck, the fighter broke apart, but left some pieces in the B-17. The left horizontal stabilizer of the Fortress and left elevator were completely torn away. The two right engines were out and one on the left had a serious oil pump leak. The vertical fin and the rudder had been damaged, the fuselage had been cut almost completely through connected only at two small parts of the frame, and the radios, electrical and oxygen systems were damaged. There was also a hole in the top that was over 16 feet long and 4 feet wide at its widest; the split in the fuselage went all the way to the top gunner's turret.



Although the tail actually bounced and swayed in the wind and twisted when the plane turned and all the control cables were severed, except one single elevator cable still worked, and the aircraft miraculously still flew!

The tail gunner was trapped because there was no floor connecting the tail to the rest of the plane. The waist and tail gunners used parts of the German fighter and their own parachute harnesses in an attempt to keep the tail from ripping off and the two sides of the fuselage from splitting apart.

While the crew was trying to keep the bomber from coming apart, the pilot continued on his bomb run and released his bombs over the target.



When the bomb bay doors were opened, the wind turbulence was so great that it blew one of the waist gunners into the broken tail section. It took several minutes and four crew members to pass him ropes from parachutes and haul him back into the forward part of the plane. When they tried to do the same for the tail gunner, the tail began flapping so hard that it began to break off. The weight of the gunner was adding some stability to the tail section, so he went back to his position. The turn back toward England had to be very slow to keep the tail from twisting off. They actually covered almost 70 miles to make the turn home. The bomber was so badly damaged that it was losing altitude and speed and was soon alone in the sky.


For a brief time, two more Me-109 German fighters attacked the All American. Despite the extensive damage, all of the machine gunners were able to respond to these attacks and soon drove off the fighters. The two waist gunners stood up with their heads sticking out through the hole in the top of the fuselage to aim and fire their machine guns. The tail gunner had to shoot in short bursts because the recoil was actually causing the plane to turn.




Allied P-51 fighters intercepted the All American as it crossed over the Channel and took one of the pictures shown. They also radioed to the base describing that the appendage was waving like a fish tail and that the plane would not make it and to send out boats to rescue the crew when they bailed out.

The fighters stayed with the Fortress, taking hand signals from Lt. Bragg and relaying them to the base. Lt. Bragg signaled that 5 parachutes and the spare had been "used" so five of the crew could not bail out. He made the decision that if they could not bail out safely, then he would stay with the plane to land it.



Two and a half hours after being hit, the aircraft made its final turn to line up with the runway while it was still over 40 miles away. It descended into an emergency landing and a normal roll-out on its landing gear.



When the ambulance pulled alongside, it was waved off because not a single member of the crew had been injured. No one could believe that the aircraft could still fly in such a condition. The Fortress sat placidly until the crew all exited through the door in the fuselage and the tail gunner had climbed down a ladder, at which time the entire rear section of the aircraft collapsed.



This old bird had done its job and brought the entire crew home uninjured.


I love these old war stories, especially the ones with a happy ending !




Please pass this on to someone who will also appreciate this amazing story.





Fwd: The B-17 -Great photo story





The B-17 -Great photo story
I read about this incident and saw some of the pictures before but had not read this detailed account of the damage to the B-17 and how the crew flew it home. It is a good read. BB
  
  
B-17 "All American" (414th Squadron, 97BG) Crew 
Pilot- Ken Bragg Jr. 
Co-pilot- G. Boyd Jr. 
Navigator- Harry C. Nuessle 
Bombardier- Ralph Burbridge 
Engineer- Joe C. James 
Radio Operator- Paul A. Galloway 
Ball Turret Gunner- Elton Conda 
Waist Gunner- Michael Zuk 
Tail Gunner- Sam T. Sarpolus 
Ground Crew Chief- Hank Hyland 

In 1943 a mid-air collision on February 1, 1943, Between a B-17 and a German fighter over the Tunis dock area became the subject of one of the most famous photographs of WW II. An enemy fighter attacking a 97th Bomb Group formation went out of control, probably with a wounded pilot, then continued its crashing descent into the rear of the fuselage of a Flying Fortress named "All American", piloted by Lt. Kendrick R. Bragg, of the 414th Bomb Squadron. When it struck, the fighter broke apart, but left some pieces in the B-17. The left horizontal stabilizer of the Fortress and left elevator were completely torn away. The two right engines were out and one on the left had a serious oil pump leak. The vertical fin and the rudder had been damaged. The fuselage had been cut almost completely through, connected only at two small parts of the frame. The radios, electrical and oxygen systems were damaged. There was also a hole in the top that was over 16-feet long and 4 feet wide at its widest. The split in the fuselage went all the way to the top gunner's turret. 
 
 Although the tail actually bounced and swayed in the wind and twisted when the plane turned. All the control cables were severed, except one single elevator cable still worked, and the aircraft miraculously still flew! 

The tail gunner was trapped because there was no floor connecting the tail to the rest of the plane. The waist and tail gunners used parts of the German fighter and their own parachute harnesses in an attempt to keep the tail from ripping off and the two sides of the fuselage from splitting apart. While the crew was trying to keep the bomber from coming apart, the pilot continued on his bomb run and released his bombs over the target. 
 
 When the bomb bay doors were opened, the wind turbulence was so great that it blew one of the waist gunners into the broken tail section. It took several minutes and four crew members to pass him ropes from parachutes and haul him back into the forward part of the plane. When they tried to do the same for the tail gunner, the tail began flapping so hard that it began to break off. The weight of the gunner was adding some stability to the tail section, so he went back to his position. 

The turn back toward England had to be very slow to keep the tail from twisting off. They actually covered almost 70 miles to make the turn home.   The bomber was so badly damaged that it was losing altitude and speed and was soon alone in the sky. 
For a brief time, two more Me-109 German fighters attacked the All American. Despite the extensive damage, all of the machine gunners were able to respond to these attacks and soon drove off the fighters. The two waist gunners stood up with their heads sticking out through the hole in the top of the fuselage to aim and fire their machine guns. The tail gunner had to shoot in short bursts because the recoil was actually causing the plane to turn. 
Allied P-51 fighters intercepted the All American as it crossed over the Channel and took one of the pictures shown. They also radioed to the base describing that the appendage was waving like a fish tail and that the plane would not make it and to send out boats to rescue the crew when they bailed out.
The fighters stayed with the Fortress, taking hand signals from Lt. Bragg and relaying them to the base. Lt. Bragg signalled that 5 parachutes and the spare had been "used" so five of the crew could not bail out. He made the decision that if they could not bail out safely, then he would stay with the plane to land it.
Two and a half hours after being hit, the aircraft made its final turn to line up with the runway while it was still over 40 miles away. It descended into an emergency landing and a normal roll-out on its landing gear. 
When the ambulance pulled alongside, it was waved off because not a single member of the crew had been injured. No one could believe that the aircraft could still fly in such a condition. The Fortress sat placidly until the crew all exited through the door in the fuselage and the tail gunner had climbed down a ladder, at which time the entire rear section of the aircraft collapsed. 
This old bird had done its job and brought the entire crew home uninjured. 
Please pass this on to someone who will also appreciate this amazing story.









Saturday Morning Breakfast

All The Saturday morning breakfast we had was a resounding success. The eggs to order, the bacon fried crispy, the fruit garnish,...